Breed Information:
Arian Farm Welsh Cardigan Corgis

Information about Corgis

PHOTOGRAPHS OF OUR BEAUTIFUL CARDIGAN WELSH CORGIS

Puppies - Anwen and Jacob's Litter 10/15/14

Contact Page

Favorite Links

Our first litter 2003

Pedigree 

More pictures 2003

More Pups 2006 Emma and Cafe's Litter

Please fill out our Corgi Questionnaire

Photoalbum

Photo Page


Go to this link to learn more: http://www.akc.org/breeds/cardigan_welsh_corgi/
A small but hardy dog was found centuries ago in the remote, misty green hills of Cardiganshire in Wales. He was a "Corgi," "Cor" for
dwarf (or perhaps "cur" for working dog) and "gi" (with a hard G sound) for dog. This "ci" or yard-long dog was highly valued by his
family as affectionate companion, guard, general farm worker, and driver of cattle.

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is a long, low fox-like dog with large upright ears, a brushy tail, moderate bone, and front legs slightly bowed around a deep chest. His appearance should conform as closely as possible to the AKC Standard, which states, "...a small, sturdy but powerful dog capable of endurance and speed." The average size is handy, approximately twelve inches at the shoulder with females ideally ranging from 25-34 pounds and males from 30-38 pounds. The Cardigan's practical coat is medium length and double with a variety of colors, shades and patterns: brindle (which gives a wood grain effect), red (brown or golden), sable (with black hair tips), blue merle (black and grey marbled) and black. Blues and blacks can have "points" (cheeks and eyebrows) in either tan (for a tricolor) or brindle. White flashings are usual on the neck (as a partial or full collar), chest, legs, muzzle, underparts, tip of tail and blaze. Black masks are acceptable along with some ticking (freckles).
As a recognized AKC breed, the Cardigan can compete in AKC dog shows. However, he does not have to be limited to conformation. In keeping with their Welsh farm heritage and intelligence, Cardigans do well in obedience, tracking, agility and, of course, herding trials. If you would like to participate in these activities, your dog's breeder, the CWCCA or the AKC can offer advice